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Tuesday, August 4, 2020 | History

3 edition of Wounds and canker diseases on western aspen found in the catalog.

Wounds and canker diseases on western aspen

Thomas E. Hinds

Wounds and canker diseases on western aspen

by Thomas E. Hinds

  • 322 Want to read
  • 18 Currently reading

Published by Forest Service, U.S. Dept. of Agriculture in [Washington] .
Written in English

    Subjects:
  • Canker (Plant disease),
  • Aspen

  • Edition Notes

    StatementT. E. Hinds and R. G. Krebill.
    SeriesU.S. Forest Service. Forest pest leaflet -- 152.
    ContributionsKrebill, R. G., 1936-
    The Physical Object
    Pagination9 p. :
    ID Numbers
    Open LibraryOL17606409M
    OCLC/WorldCa1884839

    Photo 1. Canker caused by a highly virulent form of Cryphonectria parasitica on American chestnut. Note how the pathogen causes the collapse of stems along the outer surface of the stem. If the canker girdles the stem, then transport of nutrients is disrupted and all plant material beyond the canker dies :// Five fungi cause most foliage diseases on aspen, cottonwoods and other poplar species. Foliage diseases develop readily in wet, cool weather. Elk browse on the shoots and stems of aspen trees, creating wounds and allowing the introduction of diseases. Western tent caterpiller. sooty bark canker on aspen

    Scleroderris Canker 50 Darroll D. Shilling Southern Fusiform Rust 53 S. J. Rowan Western Gall Rust 56 Richard S. Smith, Jr. Jack Pine Rusts 59 Darroil D. Shilling White Pine Blister Rust 62 Darroil D. Shilling III. FOLIAGE DISEASES 66 Lophodermium Needle Cast of Germination of ascospores of Hypoxylon mammatum in living aspen Article in Canadian Journal of Botany 50(9) January with 3 Reads How we measure 'reads'

    Abstract. Hypoxylon canker of aspen has many of the features of an ideal system for studying woody plant defense mechanisms against fungi. The primary hosts, trembling and European aspens (Populus tremuloides and P. tremula) occur over broad geographic areas of the northern hemisphere, providing an immense array of genetic and environmental diversity for the development of this :// "Diseases of Trees and Shrubs is by far the best book currently available for the horticulturist, arborist, or forester who wishes to identify disorders of forest and shade trees and woody ornamentals."—The Public Garden Melanconis diebacks and sooty canker Diseases caused by Diaportlx and Phomopsis species Diaporthc and Phomopsis cankers


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Wounds and canker diseases on western aspen by Thomas E. Hinds Download PDF EPUB FB2

Recommended Citation. Hinds, Thomas E. and Krebill, R.G., "Wounds and canker diseases on Western Aspen [Populus tremuloides]" (). Aspen :// Wounds and canker diseases on Western Aspen [Populus tremuloides] By Thomas E. Hinds and R.G. Krebill. Topics: wounds, forest trees, broadleaves, plant COVID Resources.

Reliable information about the coronavirus (COVID) is available from the World Health Organization (current situation, international travel).Numerous and frequently-updated resource results are available from this ’s WebJunction has pulled together information and resources to assist library staff as they consider how to handle coronavirus Five fungi cause most foliage diseases on aspen, cottonwoods and other poplar species.

Foliage diseases develop readily in wet, cool weather. Elk browse on the shoots and stems of aspen trees, creating wounds and allowing the introduction of diseases. Western Tent Caterpillar. Black Canker. This slowly developing canker is caused by the /common-insects-diseases-of-aspen.

Canker is a general term for a symptom of a variety of tree diseases. Cankers are sunken, discolored areas of dead tissue on branches that may ooze sap. If it progresses far enough to encircle the branch (or trunk), the portion of the tree above it will die.

In Grande Prairie, canker diseases /park-space-urban-forestry/plant-diseases-fungi/cankers. beyond the canker is killed (Figure 1).

SYMPTOMS Discrete cankers first appear on young trees as brown, slightly sunken areas in the smooth bark of branches and trunk s (Figu re 3, lef t). These canker s are ci rcular to oval or irregular in shape.

Frequently, as the canker gradually enlarges, affecte d stems are girdled and   aspen systems ranging from single clones to entire regions. Diebacks may lead to decline and death of clones when paired with factors such as chronic herbivory or drought.

Recognition of the ecological roles insects and diseases play in aspen forests, particularly when serious damage results, is a key to management in western North :// overall clone.

Aspen forests are affected by a wide variety of insects and diseases. Canker (fungal) diseases and stem borer insects are more common as trees become more stressed, and they are often present when trees die, even though the primary factor in mortality might have been drought.

It is difficult to assign a single cause of ?bidId. Cytospora canker is caused by various species of the fungus Cytospora. These pathogens affect many species of trees in Colorado, including aspen, cottonwood, lombardy and other poplars, apple, cherry, peach, plum, birch, willow, honeylocust, mountain ash,\ silver maple, spruce and His contributions are many and varied in the fields of nursery diseases, root diseases, cull surveys, and more.

But perhaps his biggest contribution was in determining what controls canker growth. His findings apply to native, facultative parasites, primarily annual and diffuse cankers (see below). The canker mainly stresses trees, allowing insect borers and other cankers (Cytospora, Sooty-bark) to kill the trees.

This is the most common canker on aspen after Cytospora canker throughout western states. Biology and Disease Cycle. Ceratocystis fimbriata overwinters in cankers. It is spread from tree to tree primarily by insects visiting ://:Ceratocystis_fimbriata.

BACTERIAL CANKER Symptoms The classic symptom of this disease consists of elongated cankers on trunk or scaffold limbs— most conspicuous during late winter or early spring. Canker surface sunken, dark purple in color (Fig.

Inner tissue of canker is orange to brown; narrow, brown streaks extend into healthy tissue above and below   Wounds and canker diseases on Western Aspen [Populus tremuloides] Thomas E.

Hinds R.G. Krebill Follow this and additional works at: Part of the Forest Sciences Commons Recommended Citation Hinds, Thomas E. and Krebill, R.G., "Wounds and canker diseases on Western Aspen [Populus tremuloides]" ()?article=&context=aspen_bib. These wounds should close without treatment, but a shellac can be used if necessary.

When a canker is on the trunk of the tree and found early enough, it may be possible to excise the canker. The key is to make sure that you cut far enough into healthy bark to remove all of the canker from the :// Sooty-bark canker is considered to be the most serious canker among tree diseases because it occurs on the larger trees on all sites.

It is most often found on mature trees of years or more, but can kill all sizes of aspen trees, usually within 3 to 10 years. The fungus attacks trees through their wounds and invades the inner bark Wounds caused by lawnmowers and weed trimmers are prime targets for infection on trees in landscaped areas.

Insects, such as oyster shell scale, stress the tree and predispose it to Cytospora infection. Insects should be controlled to prevent mortality by the combined stress of the insects and Cytospora :// In some areas of the Rocky Mountains, for example, elk gnaw extensively on the bark, leading to rapid deterioration of the stand.

However, canker diseases are by far the most serious causes of tree mortality. Citation: Johnson, David W.; Beatty, Jerome S.; Hinds, Thomas E. Cankers on Western Quaking Aspen Diseases of Trees and Shrubs by Wayne Sinclair,available at Book Depository with free delivery worldwide.

Diseases of Trees and Shrubs: Wayne Sinclair: We use cookies to give you the best possible ://   Logging wounds on residual aspen, in partially cut stands, predisposed wounded trees to attack by insects and diseases.

Five to 7 years after cutting, aspen mortality amounted to 20%; 41% of the live trees were infected with canker diseases; and 30% were in- fested with wood borers. Adequate sprouting occurred even though   Aspen (Populus tremuloides Michx.) is subject to a numher of canker diseases.

Meinecke (3), in his study of diseases of aspen in Utah, mentioned a common trunk canker that is characterized by con-centric areas of exposed wood surrounded at the canker margins by flaring, outrolled, dead bark.

In Colorado, this canker occurs on occasional. "Logging wounds on residual aspen, in partially cut stands, predisposed wounded trees to attack by insects and diseases. Five to 7 years after cutting, aspen mortality amounted to 20%; 41% of the live trees were infected with canker diseases; and 30% were infested with wood ://• Sooty-bark canker and aspen trunk rot (not Cytospora canker) tends to attack older trees, so managing aspen in rotations of less than years would reduce losses from those ://  Cytospora canker (also called leucostoma canker) is a common fungus on spruce trees, usually those stressed by severe drought, mechanical injury, poor nutrition, or hail injury.

It begins on lower branches and moves upward, first causing dying needles as sap flow is inhibited. It causes cankers in the bark of branches that ooze amber colored ://